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free e-cards in 3D





Fill in the information below to create free e-cards in 3D

1.) CHOOSE A LAYOUT


2.) FROM : 3.) TO :
*NAME : *NAME :
*EMAIL : *EMAIL :


4.) MESSAGE:
*
  
  
  


Would you like to be notified when we offer new cards?
Interested in receiving our news letter?



Did you know?
A free e-card is similar to a postcard or greeting card, with the primary difference being it is created using digital media instead of paper or other traditional materials.
They are made available by publishers usually on various Internet sites, where they can be sent to a recipient, usually via e-mail.

Free e-cards are digital "content", which makes them much more versatile than traditional greeting cards. For example unlike traditional greetings, free e-cards can be easily sent to many people at once or extensively personalized by the sender. Conceivably they could be saved to any computer or electronic device or even viewed on a television set, however free e-card digital content has not yet progressed as far as digital video or digital audio in terms of varied usage.
Typically a free e-card sender chooses from an on-line catalog of free e-cards made available on a publisher's web site. After selecting a card, the sender can personalize it to various degrees by adding a message, photo, or video. Finally the sender specifies the recipient's e-mail address and the web site delivers an e-mail message on behalf of the sender to the recipient.

This technology has improved significantly since 1996 around the time of their inception. One technical aspect that has remained mostly contstant is the delivery mechanism: The e-mail received by the recipient contains not the free e-card itself, but an individually coded link back to the publisher's web site that displays sender's card exactly as it was originally configured.

The 3d modeling stage could be described as shaping individual objects that are later used in the scene. There exist a number of 3d modeling techniques, including, but not limited to the following:
constructive solid geometry
NURBS 3d modeling
polygonal 3d modeling
subdivision surfaces
implicit surfaces
3d Modeling processes may also include editing object surface or material properties (e.g., color, luminosity, diffuse and specular shading components—more commonly called roughness and shininess, reflection characteristics, transparency or opacity, or index of refraction), adding textures, bump-maps and other features.

3d Modeling may also include various activities related to preparing a 3d model for animation (although in a complex character model this will become a stage of its own, known as rigging). Objects may be fitted with a skeleton, a central framework of an object with the capability of affecting the shape or movements of that object. This aids in the process of animation, in that the movement of the skeleton will automatically affect the corresponding portions of the model. See also Forward kinematic animation and Inverse kinematic animation. At the rigging stage, the model can also be given specific controls to make animaton easier and more intuitive, such as facial expression controls and mouth shapes (phonemes) for lipsyncing.

Tessellation and meshes
The process of transforming representations of objects, such as the middle point coordinate of a sphere and a point on its circumference into a polygon representation of a sphere, is called tessellation. This step is used in polygon-based rendering, where objects are broken down from abstract representations ("primitives") such as spheres, cones etc, to so-called meshes, which are nets of interconnected triangles.

Meshes of triangles (instead of e.g. squares) are popular as they have proven to be easy to render using scanline rendering.

Polygon representations are not used in all rendering techniques, and in these cases the tessellation step is not included in the transition from abstract representation to rendered scene.


 
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